Progressions: Making Progress

Posted by & filed under Announcements, Astrology Techniques, Morning Pages, Progressions, Uncategorized.

timing eclipse fallout Most modern astrologers make some use of secondary progressions. What are they? How are they useful? Should you use them?

Secondary progressions are a theoretical way of moving your birth chart forward to reflect your growth, maturity, and yes, progress. Here’s why they’re useful and you should use them.

Working with transits is great. Transits are more external in nature than progressions; they describe events outside you, some of which have a very dramatic impact on the course of your life. But how you react to and are affected by a transit is more likely to be seen in the secondary progressions.

For example, let’s say a family member dies. You may see this reflected in a variety of hard planetary transits. But invariably, each family member responds in a slightly different way. The one with his progressed Moon conjunct natal Uranus on that day is being asked to adjust emotionally to the fact that life can change in an instant. The one with progressed Sun square natal Pluto is being asked to step up and be the hero, to shepherd everyone else through the tragedy.

It’s the rare person who really changes much, at a core level. We all do change a little – but it’s not the transits we face that tell that story. It’s the secondary progressions that demonstrate whether or not we are evolving, reaching for our full potential, and making real progress.

Capricorn Full Moon: Slowing Down, Turning Around

Posted by & filed under Capricorn, Featured, Full Moon, Lunar Phases, Seasonal Essays.

Image from Mother Tongues

Image from Mother Tongues

I pick up the phone to hear my sister’s voice in mid-reminiscence: “Hey, you know what I remembered today?”

“What?”

“Remember when we used to go to pick mom up from work, and we’d be sitting in the car waiting…and finally she’d come out, and as she was walking towards us, one of us would say, ‘That’s my mom!’ And the other one would say, ‘Hey – that’s my mom too!’ And then we’d look at each other and go -“

Here I pick up the thread of the storyline, and together we utter a single, dramatic gasp, pretending to be soap opera characters who have suddenly realized they are long-lost sisters. “Duh duh DUH!” we cry, mimicking soap opera “moment of truth” music, and giggle helplessly.

With my sister I’m always a kid, even though we’re in our mid-50s, pushing the outer edges of middle age. For instance, she called this morning to give me an update about my nephew’s upcoming wedding. My nephew is marvelous, and I just about burst with pride every time I look at him – but like most rattled oldsters who are continually stunned by the most predictable of life’s transitions, I’m startled as well. Surely he’s not that old, that tall, driving a car, passing the bar, getting married!

Oh, what is it about summer that makes us look back with such aching nostalgia, to take stock of the years passing us by, register such alarm at the 6’3″ nephew, remember silly word games we once played – sometimes still play – with a sibling? In the past few days, the sun has turned fierce after weeks of “June gloom,” San Diego’s characteristic, pre-summer cloudiness. Some afternoons I hear the cheerful, music-box tune of an ice cream truck as it meanders down our street, and suddenly I’m seven years old. It’s all I can do to keep from chasing after him for a sidewalk sundae. These are sweet memories; why does it make me a little sad to remember them?

When the Sun enters Capricorn, we buy new calendars and draft bold resolutions for a year of success and prosperity. By the time the Sun is in Cancer and the Full Moon is in Capricorn, it’s time for reevaluation. Even if we’ve been underachievers in the first half of the year, there may still be time to reach our goals. But we can’t speed our way through this transition. Just as the sun at the summer solstice appears to stand still, that is our job at midyear: to stand still for a moment, look around, and take stock of where we are. It’s usually too late in the year to start from scratch in an entirely new direction and hope to achieve anything by year’s end. But if we take the time to look back over our shoulders and reevaluate our progress, we can then slowly revisit our goals over the next six months, reviewing our plans and filling in the missing gaps.

The later part of life’s second Saturn cycle, I’m finding, serves a similar purpose. Here I am at the summer solstice of my life, standing still and looking back at where I started out. It’s not too late to do great things with my life, but certain options are forever closed to me by the constraints of time and biology.

But is it too late to do whatever it was I wanted to do with my life, back when I was a kid? And what was that, exactly? I was always burning to do something, but not always the same thing. I loved to read, and sing, and write, and play alone. I dreamed of being famous, but never of being rich. I dreamed of being married, but never of having children. I wanted to travel the world, I think, but I was afraid of it too.

I’ve done most everything I set out to do, and I’m pretty happy with my life choices. But in the middle part of your life you begin to want to jettison parts of your past, as if to make your life more fuel-efficient so that it will carry you farther. You look for new places and situations that you can step into without all that excess cargo of stuff and failed dreams and loss.

For instance, we’ve lived in our house longer, by far, than I’ve lived anywhere else. And while I love our house, I grow tired of its problems – though I imagine what I’ve really grown tired of are my own problems, stubborn habits, failures, inertia. It’s tempting to imagine that going to a new place, you can incubate a new self.

Years ago, desperate to get a break from the house while preparing to write my first book, I rented a small office near my home. It was a tiny, womblike space no larger than 100 square feet, in a building that was part of an old church. I could do exactly what I wanted with it; nothing from my past needed to be incorporated into my little garret. It was delicious.

What I ended up with was a room unlike any I would be likely to create in my home – the colors pale and cool, the furnishings sparse. With no internet connection, there was nothing to do there but write. Some days I spent as much as an hour just sitting there by the window, enjoying the quiet, letting the breeze blow the sheer, white curtains against my arm, daydreaming. I could imagine that I was someone else, rewrite my history, and take a sort of intermission from my life.

Gradually, though, a few rogue possessions from my “real” life – a book here, a CD there – migrated to my new nest. More and more, my mind picked at the flaws in the room, my paint job, my choice of wall hangings. It was easier to write there, but my ideas weren’t necessarily any better. In short, nothing had changed but my location.

We are what we are, it seems. Even those of us who make big, seemingly permanent changes in midlife, eventually seem to find our way back to the same old patterns we established early on. How many divorcées have you seen whose second marriages became, in a very short time, a carbon copy of their first? Or restless career changers who find their new profession presents the same political and personality problems of their former one? Or for that matter, sisters who grow older but still giggle together in their same old secret language?

No, we don’t change, not usually, not much. Like crabs skittering down the beach under a pale summer moon, we move in erratic ways, not along linear paths, zigging and zagging, revisiting old missteps. In nostalgia, we long to reclaim and embrace our abandoned childhood shells. Maybe, we think, that’s when we had it exactly right about who we were and what we wanted. Maybe, maybe not. What we can reclaim, at midyear or midlife, is the excitement and promise we felt in the beginning – not yet lost to us, but only waiting for us to slow down, and turn around, and let it catch up.

© 2005/2015, April Elliott Kent

Preorder my new book, Astrological Transits (coming Aug. 2015 from Fair Winds Press) and get a free bonus e-book, “I’ll Follow the Sun: An Astrological Happiness Project.” See this page for details.

Gemini New Moon: Road Trip

Posted by & filed under Gemini, New Moon.

road-polaroidWhen you’re young, everything that happens is new. There’s no telling which joys, triumphs, tragedies, or heartbreaks are random events, and which are the first installments in storylines that will play out across your lifetime. As a child, even into your teens and your twenties, you’re still figuring out what your stories are.

Gemini and its ruling planet, Mercury, are astrology’s storytellers, delineators of your life’s narrative arc. Enter your thirties, and you begin to recognize recurring plotlines—the sorts of people who capture your heart, and how those relationships typically end; the habits that are maddeningly hard to break; your distinctive pattern of achievement and failure. In your forties, there is often a strong pull to escape from some of your stories. And by the time you reach your fifties, you’re more or less resigned to them, even philosophical. You’ve seen examples of most of what will tend to happen to you,  and it can get a little boring to watch more of it play out—but sort of comforting, too.

We tell ourselves stories about who we are, and after four or five decades, sometimes we just want a new story. I’ve wondered what it must like to be someone like Mick Jagger (not that there is anyone quite like Mick Jagger, of course, but you know what I mean), who has been playing Mick Jagger in public for fifty years, singing Satisfaction and leaping around the stage like a manic jack in the box. Does he ever just get sick and tired of the whole Mick Jagger thing? (more…)

Sagittarius Full Moon: The Shallow End of the Pool

Posted by & filed under Full Moon, Gemini, Lunar Phases.

handstand-pool_300Because genetics and fate seem to share a wry sense of humor, I often find myself at uncomfortable family gatherings where I’m one of only a few liberals in a crowd of very outspoken conservatives. It’s ironic, given these are exactly the sorts of situations I’ve spent my life avoiding. I’ve got strong convictions, but I was also raised to be polite and to avoid confrontation.

I love my family; I want to enjoy the little time we get to spend together, not fritter it away on ugly debates about immigration or health care. So I spend the day making chit-chat, biting my tongue and retreating to the patio whenever I felt my blood pressure starting to rise. At the end of the day, everyone is still on speaking terms–and I am exhausted.

After so many years, we all know the rules—what we can talk about and what we can’t. As long as we stay on neutral ground, we can maintain warm relations. Sometimes, we’re even able to wiggle our toes in deeper waters, carefully broaching the subject of our differences, and even laughing about the hard-headedness that we share in common.

But generally, it tends to be a fairly Gemini kind of relationship that results from this kind of compromise. Light and shallow, full of reminiscences and shared old jokes. Not that I particularly mind; I was born with the Moon in Gemini, and truth be told, I prefer to keep things on this kind of level most of the time. Light. Entertaining. Witty. Always moving. Loving, for sure, but not too intimate.

But at this Full Moon in Sagittarius, the sign of deep convictions noisily expressed, I find myself wondering about all the parts of myself that have to be sacrificed in order to keep my Gemini Moon feeling safe, over in the shallow end of the pool. Born with Sagittarius rising and a full ninth house, I am as much a Sagittarius at heart as I am a Leo Sun or a Gemini Moon. What I believe about this world and the next is as big a part of my life as my family’s beliefs are a part of theirs. And yet, I tend to think of myself not as someone who is committed to a strong spiritual center, but rather as someone who is constantly darting and weaving to avoid being ensnared by another’s strong opinions. (more…)

Taurus New Moon: Don’t Cry Over Spilled Syrup

Posted by & filed under Everyday Astrology, Lunar Phases, New Moon, Taurus.

taurus-dontcry-syrup_300I bought a fancy glass bottle of pancake syrup at the supermarket. When I got home, I tried to gather up too many of the grocery bags at once instead of simply making a second trip from the car to the house. Naturally, I dropped one of the bags—and of course, it was the one that contained the bottle of syrup, which smashed, covering everything else in a fine layer of goo. A shard of broken glass tore a small hole in the bag, and as I carried it into the house, I left a trail of organic Canadian maple goodness along the sidewalk, onto the porch, and across the length of the living room and kitchen.

I yelled. I cursed. I think I probably stomped my feet. I was already in a bad mood; I’d spent the morning moping about some problems I’d had with checks that hadn’t arrived, or which had arrived and promptly been lost, and spending twice as long as I’d planned at the hair salon because I’d forgotten it was a “color” day. Now I was behind in my work, feeling broke, and would have to spend time I didn’t have on cleaning up syrup. Tallying my grievances against an uncaring universe, I stamped my feet some more, sending the cats running for cover.

Then, I spent the better part of the afternoon scrubbing maple syrup from tile and wood floors and hosing it from the sidewalk. But the next morning I hit a few residual sticky patches in the living room, and while I was still grumbling about my newly adhesive shoes, a website problem came up – just minutes before an out-of-town friend was scheduled to arrive for a visit. I was ready to sit down on the floor and have a good cry.

I’m not a sun sign Scorpio, though on the days when my Moon/Pluto square acts up you could be forgiven for thinking otherwise. Such emotional drama (as only a Sun sign Leo can deliver); so much throwing of crockery and swearing! I’m pretty intense to live with.

Fortunately, I married a guy with the Moon in Taurus. Taurus’ super power is the ability to diffuse tension and drama. My Taurus mother was particularly adroit at countering my tantrums and emotional firestorms with patience and humor. She liked my husband the moment she met him, perhaps sensing that here was someone to whom she could pass the torch, who could talk me down from the occasional emotional ledge without being intimidated by my … shall we say, passionate nature. (more…)

Personal Planetary Order

Posted by & filed under Astrology Techniques, Learning Astrology, Transits.

planetary-orderTo get a general sense of how you will experience a transiting planet as it moves through its current sign, compare it to your personal planetary order.

If you list every planet, the North Node, and the Ascendant and Midheaven in degree order, and note the aspect it will receive from the transiting planet, you can see at a glance how easy or difficult this transit is likely to be for you personally.

Every transiting planet aspects these points in the same order, every time, though the aspects are different depending on its sign.

For example: Great Britain’s Prince William is a guy with a lot of planets in cardinal signs. How have transiting Uranus and Pluto in cardinal signs impacted him? Let’s take a look at Uranus in Aries. (more…)

Scorpio Full Moon: Empty the Cup

Posted by & filed under Full Moon, Lunar Phases, Scorpio.

zen-cupI’d been running at full speed for eight months straight, so I took some time off. I made no plans; I’ve barely left the house. There has been a lot of napping, reading, and mindless Netflix bingeing, punctuated by an occasional burst of productivity.

After a week and a half, I began easing back into some easy, administrative tasks. But real work, something like writing this essay, is still only barely doable.

I hadn’t just been working hard—I’d let work take over my life. Without it, a lot of empty space has opened up in my days. It’s been instructive, observing what has rushed in to fill it. Crushing weariness. A certain low-level melancholy. Insecurity. Profound laziness. Snacking. Long sessions of vacant staring.

For awhile, my work has been feeling juiceless and labored. I knew why even as I worked long, grinding days, writing furiously against narrow deadlines. When you’re not living your life, you have nothing interesting to bring to your work. You’re a husk and a shell, dusty byproducts of grain that’s been harvested, soil that is depleted.

What used to fuel my creativity was time—hours of unstructured, unproductive time. I’d spend it lying on my stomach, filling notebooks with idle dreams and scribbled wishes for my future life. Some of those dreams and wishes eventually came startlingly and specifically true. All of this was long before I knew even the little I know now about magic and ritual. I thought it was all just daydreaming. I didn’t appreciate the gravitational pull of imagination. (more…)

New Moon in Aries: Sharks

Posted by & filed under Aries, New Moon.

sharks

image by YokoIshioka, Deviant Art

In the film “Up in the Air,” George Clooney plays Ryan Bingham, whose career takes him all over the country to fire employees for companies that are downsizing. Ryan moves through life quickly, precisely, and without hesitation. He wields the machete of professional job termination with efficiency and (at least superficial) kindness, and once he has finished a job, he doesn’t look back. As Ryan tells a rapt audience of colleagues in a distinctly Aries-tinged monologue,

The slower we move, the faster we die. Make no mistake, moving is living. Some animals were meant to carry each other, to live symbiotically over a lifetime. Star crossed lovers, monogamous swans. We are not swans. We are sharks.

But at the zenith of his career, Ryan’s lifestyle of perpetual travel and unfettered independence is threatened both by new technology that could mean an end to his solitary life on the road, and by the realization that relationships mean more to him than he’d suspected.

Clooney’s Aries-like character (a confirmed bachelor) encounters the Libran other in the form of a fetching woman he meets on the road, but also in the wedding that reunites him with his family. Ryan seems surprised at the tenderness he feels for the sisters he essentially abandoned when he left their prosaic home town. As he tries – tentatively – to reconnect with them, he finds that they, too, have moved on, and that there is no easy place for him in their lives. Not only is his bachelor apartment in far-away Omaha stark, utilitarian, and not really a home; but he finds he doesn’t belong among his family, either. When someone on an airplane asks where he’s from, he simply answers, “Here.” (more…)

Astrological Grammar

Posted by & filed under Beginners, Learning Astrology.

grammarWhen someone who doesn’t know anything about astrology wants to reference it in a “humorous” way, he might say something like, “My Moon is in Uranus.” (Astrological humor almost always includes Uranus.) That’s an objectionable sentence in many ways, but most importantly, it’s poor astrological grammar. Here’s why. (more…)

Derivative Houses

Posted by & filed under Astrology Techniques, Beginners, Houses, Learning Astrology.

pigletLocating your brother’s ex-wife’s neighbor in your chart

Astrology is a complete system; your birth chart symbolizes absolutely everything—and everyone—in your life. From your mother to your best friend in high school to the cabbie who cut you off on your way to work this morning, everyone who has or will cross your path can be found in your chart. You just have to know where to look.

Each house symbolizes places, situations, and types of relationships, but there are only twelve houses. How can they cover all the characters, both major and minor, in your life’s story? Derivative houses is a method of finding relationships through the inherent connection between the houses in your chart. The cusp of the house in your chart that symbolizes the essential nature of the relationship becomes the ascendant, and a new chart derived from this new ascendant will help you find the person or matter in questions.

Counting derivative houses

To use the convoluted but not unfamiliar example referenced in the title of this section, let’s say you’re trying to track down the neighbor of your brother’s ex-wife (you suspect he stole your teacup pig).

  1. First, find your brother. Siblings are found in your third house.
  1. Next, locate your sibling’s ex-wife. Spouses past, present, and future are represented by the seventh house. BEGINNING WITH THE THIRD HOUSE (your sibling), count seven houses – the third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, and ninth. Your brother’s ex is represented by THE NINTH HOUSE.
  1. Now, to find that elusive neighbor. Neighbors are represented by the third house; so BEGINNING WITH THE NINTH HOUSE, which represents the ex-wife, count three houses: ninth, tenth, and eleventh.
  1. Voila! Your brother’s ex-wife’s neighbor is represented by the ELEVENTH HOUSE of your chart.

The pig is a different matter altogether. Livestock is associated with the sixth house. Should you find a connection between the sixth and eleventh houses (say, Taurus is on the sixth house cusp, ruled by Venus, which is in the eleventh house), it might be time to stand outside your brother’s ex-wife’s neighbor’s house and start hollering “Soo-eeeeeee!”

What rules what? Get the Rex Bills Rulership Book – most-used reference book in my library.

2011 by April Elliott Kent. Excerpted from The Essential Guide to Practical Astrology (Alpha/Penguin 2011).